Last edited by Tulabar
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Tectonics of the Western Himalayas/With Map found in the catalog.

Tectonics of the Western Himalayas/With Map

Lawrence L. Malinconico

Tectonics of the Western Himalayas/With Map

by Lawrence L. Malinconico

  • 206 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Geological Society of Amer .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Congresses,
  • Geology & the lithosphere,
  • Geology, Structural,
  • Plate Tectonics,
  • Himalaya Mountains,
  • Science/Mathematics

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsRobert J. Lillie (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages300
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8026484M
    ISBN 100813722322
    ISBN 109780813722320

    Tectonics and Evolution of the Himalaya Article (PDF Available) in Proceedings of the Indian National Science Academy 82(3) July w Reads How we measure 'reads'. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: vii, pages: illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 26 cm: Contents: Tectonics of the Nanga Parbat syntaxis and the western Himalaya: an introduction / P.J. Treloar, M.P. Searle and M.A. Khan / [and others] --The gravity field of the Karakoram Mountain Range and surrounding areas / A. .

    Tectonics of the Himalaya presents the results of integrated multidisciplinary studies, including geology, petrology, magmatism, geochemistry, geochronology and geophysics, of the structures and processes affecting the continental lithosphere. These processes and their spatial and temporal evolution have major consequences on the geometry and. Tectonic map of the Himalaya. Cross sections A through C are shown in Figure 2. The western part of Figure 1 is enlarged with more detail in Figure 5. The tectonic units of the Indian plate are defined in Table 1. The MCT corresponds with the Vaikrita thrust in the central Himalaya, the Panjal thrust in the west central Himalaya, and the Panjal.

    The Himalayas: Two continents collide Among the most dramatic and visible creations of plate-tectonic forces are the lofty Himalayas, which stretch 2, km along the border between India and Tibet. This immense mountain range began to form between 40 and 50 million years ago, when two large landmasses, India and Eurasia, driven by plate.   Some more observations. Western Himalayas are above 36°N Lat. (Mt. Godwin-Austin), and eastern Himalayas are below 28°N Lat. (Kanchenjunga). Thus the 8° difference in the latitude between the two ends of the Himalayas has affected the altitude of the regional snowline so that it is lower in western Himalayas and higher in the east.


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Tectonics of the Western Himalayas/With Map by Lawrence L. Malinconico Download PDF EPUB FB2

Tectonics of the Western Himalayas/With Map (SPECIAL PAPER (GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA)) by Lawrence L. Malinconico (Author), Robert J. Lillie (Editor) ISBN Metamorphic, magmatic, and tectonic evolution of the central Karakoram in the Biafo-Baltoro-Hushe regions of northern Pakistan Author(s) M.

Searle. --A petrologic record of the collision between the Kohistan Island-Arc and Indian Plate, northwest Himalaya / C. Page Chamberlain, M. Qasim Jan, and Peter K. Zeitler --The Bhagirathi leucogranite of the High Himalaya (Garhwal, India); age, petrogenesis, and tectonic implications /. Active faults and their relevant tectonic features are discussed in order to clarify the neotectonics of the Himalayan collision.

Active faults have been discovered by means of interpretation of topographic maps and aerial photographs, as well as by field studies. The frontal zone of the Himalaya is most active at present.

This book compiles and synthesizes the post data of the Western Himalaya. The geology of Western Himalaya is described under a tectonic zone framework, and wherever necessary, different regions are discussed separately under each tectonic zone. A geological map of the Western Himalaya has been compiled onscale.

Yannick Duroy, Abul Farah, Robert J. Lillie, "Subsurface densities and lithospheric flexure of the Himalayan foreland in Pakistan", Tectonics of the western Himalayas, Lawrence L. Malinconico, Jr., Robert J. Lillie.

Skardu Basin is a northwest-trending intermontane basin along the Indus River in the Karakoram Himalaya Mountains of Pakistan.

Seismotectonic domain boundaries in the Karakoram Himalaya commonly cross lithologic and some older structural boundaries. The Himalayan mountain belt, which developed during the India–Asia collision starting about 55 Ma ago, is a dramatically active orogen and it is regarded as the classic collisional orogen.

It is characterized by an impressively continuous km of tectonic units, thrusts and normal faults, as well as large volumes of high-grade metamorphic. A detailed Map explaining the Plate Tectonics and the Geology of the Himalayas and their formation.

Helps us understand the basic fault lines between the Indian and the Eurasian Plate. Many other smaller details make it a good guide to understanding the formation and the evolution of the Himalayas.

Here, ascale geological map of the central Himalaya of Western Region, Nepal is presented. This map represents a compilation of previously published maps. The Western Himalaya has been studied more exten- sively than the other parts of the Himalaya.

In recent years a large volume of geological data on structural framework, sedimentary facies, bio- stratigraphy and geochemistry of the rocks from different tectonic zones of the Western Himalaya have been published.

Summary. The present study aims at making a contribution to the tectonics of the Western Himalayan Regions of Jammu, Kashmir and Ladakh.

During the summer ofthe orientation of many joints has been measured in outcrops along the road from Jammuvia Srinagar to Leh. Based upon the contention that the visible rock-joints are shear surfaces produced by the.

The Himalayas, or Himalaya (/ ˌ h ɪ m ə ˈ l eɪ ə, h ɪ ˈ m ɑː l ə j ə /), (Sanskrit: himá (हिम, "snow") and ā-laya (आलय, "abode, receptacle, dwelling")), is a mountain range in Asia separating the plains of the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan range has many of Earth's highest peaks, including the highest, Mount Everest, at the border between Nepal and.

The geology of the Himalaya is a record of the most dramatic and visible creations of modern plate tectonic forces. The Himalayas, which stretch over km between the Namche Barwa syntaxis in Tibet and the Nanga Parbat syntaxis in Pakistan/India (disputed), are the result of an ongoing orogeny — the result of a collision of the continental crust of two tectonic plates.

This has created some uncertainties in the correlation of the formations. A compiled geological map of the western Nepal Lesser Himalaya is presented in Fig. 4 and stratigraphic columns along various measured sections that exclude the crystalline nappes are given in Fig. 5, Fig. Some parts of the mountains, rising at.

a fast rate of over 5 mm/yr, expose granitic plutons only a few million years old. I~l terms of plate tectonics the opening of the western part of the Indian Ocean and the 4, km northward drift.

There are geological/tectonic maps of parts of western NW Himalaya by Desio, 2) Fuchs, 3) Tahirkheli and Jan, 4) KK Sharma, 5) Searle and Khan, 6) Pecher et al.,and 7) Geol. Surv. Pakistan. There. The western syntaxis of the Himalaya is one of the most exciting frontiers for continental tectonic studies.

The region around the mountain of Nanga Parbat has some of the highest peaks, deepest valleys and highest uplift, exhumation and erosion rates known on : Hardcover. TECTONICS, VOL. 20, NO. 4, PAGESAUGUST Stratigraphy, structure, and tectonic evolution of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt in western Nepal Peter G.

DeCelles, 1 Delores M. Robinson, 1 Jay Quade, 1 T. Ojha, 1 Carmala N. Garzione, 2 Peter Copeland, • and B ishal N. Upreti 4 Abstract. The structure is cored by high-grade metamorphosed rocks, locally formed at high pressure.

Higher tectonic units wrap around and dip away from the uplifted core in an inverted U-shaped pattern in map view. This, and a similar structure at Nanga Parbat in the western Himalayan syntaxis, characterize the two syntaxes at opposite ends of the Himalaya.

This book compiles and synthesizes the post data of the Western Himalaya. The geology of Western Himalaya is described under a tectonic zone framework, and wherever necessary, different regions are discussed separately under each tectonic zone.

A geological map of the Western Himalaya has been compiled onscale.The majestic and sublime Himalayas have long exerted a powerful force on the imaginations of explorers and travelers. Indeed, as a challenge for these adventurous souls, the mountain wilderness that separates the Indian subcontinent from Inner Asia is unique: no similar region has everaroused such intense interest.

When Men and Mountains Meet, a book based largely on 4/5(2). Tectonic plates don’t tend to collide at neat right angles, let alone in some configuration as to create a nearly perfect box of mountains in the middle of a .